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is an attempt to deal with this country's global foot print to create new strategic environment where the u.s. is supposedly more likely to be dealing in surgical operations and not heavy ground invasions. since the former vice president chose to compare food stamps and the defense budget, let's go ahead and take a look at what's actually happening on that front, too. the recently enacted farm bill cut the food stamp program by $8 billion which means about 850,000 households will lose $90 in monthly benefits. we've reported on that. this year, after 47 million people saw their food stamp benefits reduced because of budget cuts, that's the context, and yet everyone's talking about the military cuts because secretary hagel's proposed pentagon budget makes for an easy headline. like this. "pentagon plans to shrink army to pre world war ii level." okay. here's what some of those cuts actually look like. this is the context behind these headlines. on the left there, see the military's current level. in the middle, the proposed level. on the right, 1940 levels. here are total numbers. so while it
, and which prohibited commonsense uses of cheap and safe fuel that could actually help the environment. and department of transportation regulations that, without increasing safety, vastly increased record eping for ready-mix concrete drivers, unnecessarily limited their hours and suppressed their wages. title 2 of the alert act helps to protect people like bob sells and his workers from regulations that ask job creators to achieve the unyou a cheeveble. do not -- the unachievable, do not help to control targets, suppress hours and wages for no good reasons and inundate americans with unnecessary paperwork. title 3 of the alert act offers long-needed help to small business people like carl harris, the vice president and general manager of carl harris company in wichita, kansas. mr. harris is a small homebuilder. every day he has to fight and overcome the fact that government regulations now account for 25% of the final price of a new single-family home. mr. harris participants in small business review panels, existing law uses to try to lower the cost of regulations for small businesse
. this is what the environment secretary said, and i quote, people get very emotional about this. people should just accept the climate has been changing for century. he refuses to be briefed on climate change. the energy minister when asked about climate change said this -- you're not going to draw me on that. i haven't had time to get into the climate change debate. [laughter] he is the energy minister, mr. speaker. will he clarify? is a habit of climate change deniers in this government? >> this is a new approach to prime minister's questions. you come to the house of commons and praise the prime minister for his commitment to climate change. [shouting] i like the new style but i thought -- i think this is much more refreshing. this government has a solid track record of cutting carbon, negotiating internationally, to of investing in nuclear, the biggest renewable energy program that we've seen in our countries history. for the first time in a long, we are on track to meet up renewable target. perhaps he would like to get up again and congratulate me for this excellent record on the environm
is they actually know who you are in a banking environment without having to use a password, just based on .our bio metric interaction they came to us and it was competitive. putting $3 million together and the way it works is we aggregate the investors who go on to our site and see a presentation from the company and watch a rep -- webinar, and they decide and start from $10,000 up. you can try to pick the next whatsapp. it is critical to mention you have got to build a portfolio. this stuff is so risky. you have to diversify. if you do not have 5, 10, or 15 of the companies, you're not doing it right. today ormpany started even in the last few years, do you see their equity strategy as acquisitions or going the ipo route? >> people always prefer ipo because you can build real value and continue building the company. an ipo is another funding event to raise money and better valuation so you continue to build value. most ipos are not showing several others -- selling shareholders. there are a lot of them in israel. 800 are bought for each woman goes public. we have a lot of companies traded in new
. the project would be bad for the environment. in january the u.s. state department released a report saying it would have little environmental impact. >> it is moving on a busy highway between houston and dallas, texas after a highway was turned into a ice skating rink. causing gridlock on the 30 mile stretch of the highway for about 16 hours. >> people stuck in their cars for 14 hours. we had people sleep in the parking lot in their cars because there was no place to go. there were no hotel rooms left. >> traffic began moving late last night. law enforcement urging caution and to watch out for the black ice. >> the weather continues to be a big story across the country. the snow may be gone but freezing temperatures they are not. >> another blast of arctic air celting across half of occur ur country. >> the temperatures seeing well below average across the midwest the plains ants into the northeast. that has been a trend for the last several months. the cold arctic blast settling in. the current windchill temperatures as you head out the door this morning staying below zero in the teens in
. c p s says it's working to ensure a proper environment for students to take the test. according to some parents, but district made calls to stress the test is required by state and federal law. >> i am against it. i sent my daughter out of it because i am aware is not counting toward promotion or anything. >> the state board of education says the test provide a valuable data on how districts are ferrying in meeting higher benchmarks. this morning the test is supposed to be administered to all students grades 3-8 regardless of whether they are opting out. back to you. >> suspended. getting a second chance. cbs took away their city championship and their 24 victories because they used players that were academically ineligible. the head coach was suspended. now the illinois high school association says the school can still be in the state tournament. there will keep their top seed but they still won't have two of their best players or coaches. parents of players at other schools have mixed reactions. >> i think they should have a chance especially if there were number one the work
environment to work in. we should point out, these three individuals, these al jazeera journalists are among thousands of protesters, activists and other journalists who are facing a similar ordeal many say it's trials like this and other detentions that are a troubling sign that egypt is going back to a repressive, authoritative state instead of going towards fulfilling the promises of the 2011 revolution. >> syrian government forces are waging a campaign of siege warfare and starvation against civilians as part of the military campaign against rebel fighters. >> that's among the findings of a u.n.-mandated independent report which has just been released. the investigation, catalogue of the suffering 250,000 people who are besieged across syria, government forces were accused of denying basic aid in order to force people to choose between surrender and stashation. war crimes have been committed by opposition groups. more from geneva >> reporter: this is that report. 7th report of the independent international commission on inquiry on syria since that commission was set up by the u.n. in 201
. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that is a little bit more forgiving. gwen: launching a new effort to help young men and boys of color. covering the week pete williams of nbc news. ed o'keefe of "the washington post." and michael sheerer of "time" magazine. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> it's one of the most amazing things we build and it doesn't even fly. we build classrooms and exhibit halls, mentoring tomorrow's innovators, we preserve habitats and serving america's veterans. every day thousands of boeing volunteers help their community be the best they can be, building something better for all of us. >> whether it's discovering an aspirin a day can prevent heart attacks worldwide or regenerating new heart muscles, our goal is to develop treatment. brigham and women's hospital. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- prudential. addition funding is
environment requires us to requirementize and make difficult choices. some we must make now. >> despite the problems and the cost overruns, the military has no plans to scrap the f35. russia and china are developing fighters that will outgun and outfly the u.s. fleet. the question is whether the pentagon can make good on the promise of a jet that can tackle all threats in all conditions. >> the budget proposal calls for retiring the u2 spy plan for one controlled remotely. >> a pregnant woman apparently drove into the water, driving a minnie van with her three children, ages 10, 9 and 3. life guards and other beach goers rushed in. they pulled all for to safety before the van was submerged by the waves. one of the children told rescue areas, "mummy is trying to kill us, please help." the mother was incoherent, uncooperative. she is undergoing psychiatric evaluation, the children have been placed in protective custody. >> tex joons have gone to the polls. greg abbott peat out eight other candidates, facing off against wendy davis. she is the first female nom ni since ann richards in 1994
environment, and i would hope that everyone understand that it is all about order. and if we don't have order, we cannot provide programs. we're constantly looking down institutions. since the hearing in 2012, we have restricted housing population reduction by 25 perce percent. we have gone from 13.5 percent to 6.5 percent. so reductions are occurring. we are only interested in placing people in restrictive housing when there is justification. we have 20,000 gang members in our system. they are watching this hearing. they are watching our testimony very, very closely for the reason being if they see we will lower standards and not hold the individuals accountable, it puts the staff and inmates at risk. and this is why i mentioned in my oral statement, we are looking at staff being injured and harmed but our staff is putting their lives on the line to protect the american public. and we have inmates within the population who are being harmed by these individuals who have no respect, i mean no respect for other's when it comes to their safety. we cannot afford, at any time, to say that for thos
for a solitary confinement has left some sense reductions environment to of violence, restraint shares, inmates can themselves up which used to happen every week. almost totally eliminated as a result of these changes. reducing the duration. those that used to go there for drugs, they may still go, but if they test claim of bacon graduate out of solitary confinement and a summit is being kept for more than 72 hours a decision is reviewed by the commissioner. i also want to know that one of the keys in texas to reduce in solitary confinement has been the gain enunciation program. announcing their gang. i also want to point out that using sanctions and incentives behind bars is a way to provide for incentives that the inmates to be a better which therefore reduces the need for solitary confinement. one of the models of the parallel universe model. the longer curfew. does that ms. b gave have been denied privileges such as making donegals and access to the mail and other things. this creates a positive incentive. we notice things like the white hope program. there is a 24 hours timeout. we have to
the environment and clean water standards is not antigrowth. in fact, it's projobs. when i recently toured the family-run trucking company in my district, they were not against truck safety standards. they do the right thing by their workers and they abide by safe driving rules. and they want regulations to ensure that others do the same. what they are against are new truck safety standards that hinder growth without actually making trucking any safer. smarter regulations should protect good businesses from bad actors. i'll give you another example. denny hudson, he runs sea coast bank, a small community bank in florida. like many small financial institutions, they weathered the financial crisis because they were not involved in the risky financial behavior. they expected mortgages to be repaid on time and they wanted the small businesses they supported to succeed. after the financial crisis of 2008, nearly took down the global economy, most people agreed that government regulators needed to better protect our financial system. but if new regulations keep community banks like sea coast fro
connell and the staunch opposition to obamacare. >> you know what in a sane environment people do when they have problems with a good objective? they fix the problems. the other choice is to just pout if you're not -- if your pear is not in the white house and make as many problems as you can, stop anything good from happening and if you cane stop it at least bad mouth it. and then when life being what it is and all of us being imperfect as we are, when there's a problem, do everything you can to make sure the problem is never fixed. it may work and get people torn up and mad all the time. but it's a dumb way to run a country. >> so according to the latest poll in kentucky, it's still anybody's race with grimes leading mcconnell. mcconnell's unpopularity may be leading the polls. mitch mcconnell seems anything but worried about the former president campaigning in his home state. he was asked about it yesterday on capitol hill. >> welcome him back. the last time he ran in 1996 he eked out a narrow victory in kentucky while i beat the current gov any by 160,000 votes, 10 points. in 2008 both bill and hilla
environment he has here in chicago. it's handmade marquee says it all. as much irq esteem. he's one of the dozens of at risk kids who take part. and here zachariah learns the most important lesson of all. that in life, you fall and fall again, and you keep ongoing. >> when i fall, i get back up. >> i wanted to help him understand perseverance, and motivation, and perspective and looking forward to things and having plans. >> the unicycle is zachariah's favorite. it's all free for zachariah, but his sister feels that what the circus does for him is invaluable. she knows firsthand because she used to be in this too. >> the gang bang members in the streets, we still get affected by what's around us, but i guess it gives you two hours in a day in which you're not. >> and zachariah's future? well, he's still juggling that. >> i would really like to work as a doctor, and i think my boss will give me money so i can give it to charity. idle really like to be a cameraman and do a circus theme. >> and for zachariah, all of those falls of circus themes have helped him find the best in himse
, public or private. if we really want a stable, predictable business environment, we wouldn't be going down this path. at the end of the day, again, the proposition is very straightforward. if you support consumer protection, you will vote no on this legislation. if you oppose consumer protection, you will vote yes. but i plead with you to please vote no. hank you, mr. chair. the chair: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. hensarling: mr. chairman, i yield myself five seconds to encourage the gentleman from washington to read section 1017 of the dodd-frank fact and would discover that the cfpb is funded by the federal reserve which happens to be taxpayer money. at this time, mr. chairman, i'm happy to yield one minute to the gentleman from missouri, mr. luetkemeyer, the vice chairman of our housing subcommittee. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. luetkemeyer: thank you, mr. chairman. my colleagues have done a good job listing problems of the cfpb. i want to tell you about the overreach of this already. one business purchased a small lending company and
to build healthier learning environments for our kids. part of this effort will be eliminating advertisements for unhealthy food and beverages in our schools. thatnk we can all agree our classroom should be healthy places where kids are not bombarded with ads for junk food. food marketing guidelines are tot of the larger effort inspire companies to think about how they campaign for food to kids. kids watch thousands of food advertisements every year. 86% of these ads are for products loaded with sugar and salt. our kids see an average of just one ad a week for healthy products like water, fruits and vegetables. just one. begun the we have first ever white house summit on food advertising to children, asking businesses to stop marketing unhealthy foods to kids and do more to get kids excited about healthy foods. should applynciple to our schools. about theant to talk "let's move" campaign. the federal government's efforts to combat childhood obesity. you can see the numbers on your screen. do you think this is a good idea? isn't an area of the federal area that the federal gover
their bills. this bill provides a commonsense way to protect our environment by setting emissions standards that are actually achieveable. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from indiana yields back. the gentleman from kentucky reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: i yield three minutes to the gentleman from west virginia, mr. rahall. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. rahall: thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate the ranking member yielding me this time, especially since we do not see eye to eye on this particular piece of legislation. we do see eye to eye on numerous other issues before the congress and the american people, such as protecting the health and safety of our nation's coal miners and our american workers, and indeed, we all, both sides of the aisle, share the common goal of wanting to provide clean water, clean air, and health and safety for our families each and every day of the year. in that sense, we all have that common ground. the
'm not arguing that. you know what the real answer is, create an economic environment where we have jobs 37 and the best way we can do that is unleash energy in the country. the president won't allow that to happen because he's reduced leases by 50%. >> the >> ceos said we'd lose 500,000 jobs because of the incentive of obamacare subsidies. welfare and food stamps. >> moms depend on welfare, we need a family back. now you're going to have no more food stamps >> young and low skilled workers repeatedly get hurt from minimum wage. >> whatever. that is your village. has jimmy fallon's new show become a safe haven for the left? coming up, next. my dad has atrial fibrillation, or afib. he has the most common kind... ...it's not caused by a heart valve problem. dad, it says your afib puts you at 5 times greater risk of a stroke. that's why i take my warfarin every day. but it looks like maybe we should ask your doctor about pradaxa. in a clinical trial, pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate)... ...was proven superior to warfarin at reducing the risk of stroke. and unlike warfarin, with no regu
environment with you. what have you told the court in this plea, this desperate plea, to keep your 6-year-old granddaughter? >> i've told them that he's a convicted felon, i've told them that he offered her to me for sale. during a phone conversation with him. he said when he was in tacoma holding facility, immigration holding facility prior to his deportation, he said that he would sign her over to me if i paid for immigration attorney to keep him here in the united states. i told the court that it was equivalent to human trafficking, and that with her emotional issues, that it was the wrong thing to do to send her, essentially, to another world that she doesn't know. >> what is your worst fear here? listen, we do know that people with felony convictions in many cases, obviously, are allowed to keep their children. a conviction does not mean that you are not going to be able to care for that child, particularly if it's not an offense against that child, but what is your worst fear as her grand mom knowing that in the end she could end up there with this man? >> if, you know, i believe ev
environment people do when they have problems with a good objective, they fix the problems. in the end, that's really what alison is telling you, send me to washington, i'll do something that makes sense, and if there's a problem with it, i'll fix it. >> and today, in the latest sign the clinton machine is revving up, the most aggressive outside group supporting hillary clinton these days -- american bridge -- has released its first web ad defending her. the target? kentucky senator rand paul who's revived attacks on the clintons, in particular bill clinton, over the monica lewinsky affair. its message? paul is obsessed with the '90s. >> rand paul is out there, he's banging on the clintons every day. now, what's his strategy? >> well, i'm not certain he has a strategy. >> there's a lot of things going on right now that we need to be concerned about other than what happened 15 years ago. >> the record is what will be judged upon. >> it's not a long-term winning strategy for republicans. let's all go back and dance the macarena and talk about 1998. ♪ >> by the way, given that paul has called
states. dina cappiello, the national environment reporter for the associated press, joins me now. 27 1/2 million dollars in finds, $200 million for the cleanup. in the range of penalty, how does this rank? >> it's the biggest ever for a company that violates its water pollution permits. other companies that paid big fines in the past in 2008, the e.p.a. said this is the biggest ever for a company that violated permits it had from states. >> ifill: describe the pollution. >> we're talking about 6,000 violations over 300 state-issued permits, hundreds of streams, tributaries and rivers, 79 active coal minus, over 20 coal processing plants where they put the coal and wash it before it's shipped, over five appalachian states, so it's a pretty massive coverage area for the settlement. >> reportersettlement. >> ifill: how did the discharges occur? >> they're actually piped into the waterways and states issue permits for the companies that give them certain limits and in this case this company repeatedly from 2006 to 2013 exceeded those limits, that they were actually authorized to discharge.
. are you arguing at this point when you look at the environment, technology, what we're up against, there isn't really a logical place for federalism here because of what you just mentioned? >> no, there's certainly a logical place and the states can easily go beyond what the federal government is requiring, and they are. you've had the northeastern states that entered into a compact on greenhouse gases and do some carbon trading, so there's a lot the states can and will do, but bottom line, these are issues that affect all americans, actually, they affect the world, and we need to be taking action on them. the world's not going to end tomorrow. nobody says that, but i think anyone who has been outside in the last year understands that things are changing. i mean, the world has changed since it was formed, but what we're putting into the atmosphere and the way we're changing land use is having an impact, making these things happen faster and be more severe, and we've got to slow them down to start to anticipate what we're going to have to deal with. >> and what do you say to republ
for the rest of this year. you know, i've worked in education, environment, science research, policy, and civil liberties, and, oh, voting procedures. a number of things over the, well, now nearly two decades. i'm in my 16th year, i guess. so i could point to a number of those things. but i do stand by that statement, that the congress is the greatest instrument. doesn't always work perfectly, there are days when it hardly works at all, but it is a great instrument for justice and human welfare. >> yeah, and i understand that you feel that way, and i think that probably comes from your pride of office and the hard work you do, but the composition congress has changed a lot, as we mentioned, "the times" and others focus on the fact when you depart, only one scientist will be left, there are a lot fewer veterans than there used to be, there's a lot more upper, upper incomes, anyone stationed in life and previous job or role or training isn't the only thing you can say about them. i do think it's fair to say that the institution has changed in the aggregate of who's in it, and i don't think it's a
difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. when i was their age, i was a lot like them. i didn't have ad in the house. and i was angry about it even though i didn't necessarily realize it at the time. i made bad choices. i got high without always thinking about the harm that it could do. groups that have had the odds stacked against them in unique ways that require unique solutions. groups who've seen fewer opportunities that have spanned generations. the worst part is that we become numb to these statistics. we're not surprised by them. we take them as the norm. we just assume this is an inevitable part of american life instead of the outrage that it is. [ applause ] >> and i -- and i believe the continuing struggles of so many boys and young men, the fact that too many of them are falling by the way side, dropping out, unemployed, involved in negative behavior, being pro filed. so we need to change the statistics. not just for the sake of the young men and boys, but for the sake of america's future. and that's -- that's why in the aftermath of the
and world bank call enabling environment. that is essentially the trust of businesses in the rule of law. it is not a shortage of money. there are enormously wealthy afghans and regional investors would like to put money but the question is can they trust in the rules of the game and world of law to do that. what would be the rules that governor enthe sector in particular. minerals will not be the magic bullet but oil and gas resources discovered recently have been quite immense. it is not inconceivable in 10 to 15 years this can more than underwrite the cost of the sustaining services within the country. so in conclusion i think let's move from looking for the quick fixes and magic bullets understanding that peace and stability, governance will be at the heart of peace and is it stability and small wins will win for the after bans and the question, can the politics deliver something that the 90% of afghans who believe in more than 90% believe in law and order and want that future can realize it. >> thank you. david. >> thank you very much andrew. it is a quite a pleasure to be here. i w
the prosupposed keystone oil pipeline. claiming it would damage the environment. nearly 400 people were arrested in the protest. >>> and finally, one of the great golf shots you will ever see. it came on the 18th hole in a playoff round in a women's tournament in singapore. take a look. everything on the line for paula creamer facing a virtually impossible 70-foot putt. look at that ball, trickle down, and then break about a foot right to left. tracing an arc into the cup. go crazy, paula. go crazy. >> she can't believe it. >> she can't believe it, no way. >> did i do that? >> her first title in four years. she says she could probably stand there again all day long and not come within six feet of the hole. a wonderful moment. >> that is so great. >>> the weather not so great for many people. >> you know, and it was so bad here. guess what, by next weekend here it will be 80 and nice. just to let you know. a special place to show you my weather. come on over with me. give you an idea of what's happened. the wind chill 12 below in chicago. 9 below in st. louis and 3 below pittsburgh. a real quick
to determine if the spike is result of better detection or changes in the environment. >>> microsoft co-founder bill gates back on top on the list of the world's richest people with a net worth of $76 billion. gates reclaimed the top spot after a four-year hiatus. second on the list with $72 billion. and american business magnet warren buffett was fourth. >>> pizza hut taking the build your own pizza concept to a whole new level. the company is testing a new interactive table top that allows customers to order pizza at their seats using touch screen technology. allows the customers to choose the size of their pizza, crust, how much cheese they want and where they want their toppings. no word yet on how long it'll be before you see it at your local pizza hut. how about breakfast? it is national pancake day. and to celebrate ihop restaurants nationwide are offering up a free short stack of buttermilk pancakes to the customers and in return for the free food, ihop asks you consider leaving a donation for the children's miracle network or other charities. >>> how does an athlete from indian
his opposition to obamacare. >> you know what, in a sane environment do when they have problems with a good objective in they fix the problems. the other choice is to just pout if you're not in the white -- if your party is not in the white house, and make as many problems as you can, stop anything good from happening. and if you can't stop it, at least bad-mouth it, and then when life being what it is and all of us being imperfect as we are, when there's a problem, do everything you can to make sure the problem is never fixed. it may work in an election get people all torn up, everybody mad all the time. but it's a dumb way to run a country. >> let's bring in nbc news political reporter kasie hunt, who spent time in ken last week with all of the top candidates. she did a great piece for us, looking at the senate race. your take on the latest developments, including bill clinton being brought in. >> delivering a stem-winder, as usual. clinton was trying to, in that bite you just played, sort of lay out an argument that alison grimes could use as she tries to defend the policies
to this. in future environments, ciber will be the first tool used. >> by both sides? >> by both sides. host: we are joined by paul mcleary a you are watching the exchange at the senate armed services committee earlier this week. the united states, it there's not much dispute that the u.s. has the best conventional military force in the world but how do our cyber capability stack up against other countries? guest: it's hard to measure. the chinese have put a lot of money into this and they have a lot of resources and assets directed toward this but their budget is not public like ours. you don't know exactly what they are doing. what general alexander was saying cuts to the heart of the matter. mightwar, whatever that be, offense or defense of, there is no manual for it. it is a whole new world, a new form of warfare. how do you conduct it, what does it mean, when would this lead to more conventional operations and how do u.s. collate or de-escalate and how do you make that a determined factor to prevent future conflicts? host: if you want to talk about these subjects or have a questio
promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. >>> hello, nerdland. prepare yourself for a moment of deja vu. or maybe i should say, deja vote. see what i did there? because i can't say it any better than melissa or joy reid already have, like, you know, last weekend. >> unfortunately, it also means we've had to dust off the tried and true graphic that regular viewers of mhp show will remember from the last election cycle, back in 2012. that's right, this week in voter suppression! and this week in voter suppression, the state of ohio is back at it again. >> now, you guys know i love joy. it is not a contest. but let me try. once again, today, we have an edition of "this week in voter suppression sclts "! and it's brought to you by the letters o-h-i-o. it was just over a week ago that ohio governor john kasich signed laws that cut six days off of early voting and absentee ballots were limited and john husted delivered another setback to voting rights with another cu
and get sick and ruin the environment and destroy, but they want to do all kinds -- we have a lot of unconscious behavior as you're aware, right? and i think that if the world meditated, we could make better decision. i think what the buddhist said, check for your yourself. because if you just listen to television, then you'll have a mind full of fluctuation and noise and that promotes sickness and sadness. if you can have a empty mind or a mind that is a little bit more clear, then your happiness comes. it's that simple. happiness, sick and sadness. >> russell, what brought you all of those years ago to meditation? people associate you with hip-hop and i don't think at least then they would have associated quiet meditation with the world of hip-hop. >> i did yoga first. i went to yoga class in brentwood. the teacher steve ross played loud rap music all of the time. i went there because of the chicks. all girls and one guy in yoga 20 years ago. >> that is why you get into anything. >> right. >> of course. i went to yoga and i came out of the first class quiet time and came out you
and it improves the environment. so we can and do disagree in this congress on the causes of climate change and the best fuel mix to meet america's energy demands, but we can all agree that less is more. whatever your fuel source, if you use less you save money, and that's good for all of us concerned. we can also agree that creating demand for american-made energy efficient products will also create good jobs, and energy efficiency, cheapest fuel, requires, as i said, labor and manufactured goods that are made in america. and we can also all agree that cutting the energy bills of homeowners, businesses and the federal government and therefore the taxpayer is a very good thing. . mr. speaker, the vermont that a i represent has long been a leader in energy efficiency. my home state was the first to set up what was called an energy efficiency utility. that utility, efficiency vermont, has done outstanding work for the past 20 years. basically what it acknowledges and understands is that a kilowatt saved is a cost avoided. last year alone efficiency vermont's work yieldled -- yielded a lifetim
it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. ♪ >>> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. oh, the rain! there's so much rain coming to l.a. take a live look at new york city, why don't you? back on set, we have eugene robinson, here in new york, john hywellman, thomas robertis, and this washington, sam stein. >>> the tea party movement. its leaders are trying to steer the message into the future with a renewed tone. senator rand paul is trying to keep the movement from being side tracked with an apparent reference to recent remarks by rocker ted nugent about president obama. >> we have to reach out to more people, not just those of us here. it has to be a bigger party, and it has to be a bigger movement. there are times -- and i don't think it is our movement -- but there are times when people are using language that shouldn't be used, and i recently criticized someone for using some of that language, and i'm not going to bring it up. but i will say
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